Friday, December 23, 2016

Ancient Egypt this week Redux: Call the Doctor



Ancient Egyptian doctor returns to Hearst Museum, all three tons of him

The three-ton lid of the coffin of an ancient Egyptian doctor has been carefully removed from storage and maneuvered into a new resting place at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology’s newly renovated gallery in Kroeber Hall at UC Berkeley.

When the museum reopens to the public in April 2017, visitors will find the “Doctor” near the entrance, where he will command a spotlight for years to come.

Laboratoriorosso

Laboratoriorosso is a company whose activity focuses on a wide range of subject matters ranging from publishing, exhibit logistics and organization, documentary making, audiovisual products. Sandro Vannini is Laboratoriorosso’s Director. Over the past nine years the company has produced five documentaries, photographic printed and electronic books, and many 3D animations, using high-resolution photographic shooting techniques. Future projects include more documentaries in Egypt and the production of new photographic books.

Filling the Holes in Egypt’s History Left by Looting

UPON ENTERING THE EGYPTIAN MUSEUM AS TOURISTS SCAN THE CASES OF “WONDERFUL THINGS,” ONE CASE CONTAINING A STUNNING SARCOPHAGUS STANDS OUT. IT’S EYE CATCHING NOT ONLY BECAUSE OF THE BEAUTY OF THE ARTIFACT, BUT ALSO BECAUSE THE LABEL DESCRIBING ITS LOCATION SAYS “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.” NO, THIS IS NOT A REPRODUCTION—IT’S A STOLEN ANTIQUITY THAT WAS TRAFFICKED OUT OF EGYPT, AND ONE OF THE FEW LOOTED PIECES THAT HAS MADE ITS WAY HOME.

Known as “Shesep-Amun-Tay-Es-Heret,” or simply “the Lady of the House,” this artifact was the highlight of a repatriation ceremony that took place in April 2015 in Washington, DC. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security Immigration and Customs Enforcement (DHS ICE) seized the sarcophagus in 2009, not from a shipping container or from the auction block, but from an antiquities dealer’s garage in Brooklyn during the investigation for a case dubbed “Operation Mummy’s Curse.”

Nine-year-old reviews the new Egyptian Mummies exhibition
Photograph: Ryan Hernandez, MAAS

Nine-year-old reviewer Thom Blake gives us his first impression of the Powerhouse Museum’s latest exhibition.

This exhibition is all about six different Egyptian mummies and how they were buried. It also explores what is under the wrappings of these ancient mysteries.

Defy Age Using a 3,600-Year-Old Face Cream Recipe With a Deadly Ingredient
WELLCOME IMAGES/PUBLIC DOMAIN
Stanley Jacobs has been fascinated with ancient Egypt for as long as he can recall, but his obsession with one particular passage in one particular document started a little over 15 years ago. At an annual meeting of Egyptology enthusiasts, he hunted down, on the recommendation of a patient, an ancient Egyptian text about surgery known as the Edwin Smith Papyrus.

Stolen relief of Queen Hatshepsut recovered from London

Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities received from London on Tuesday a limestone relief that was stolen from Queen Hatshepsut’s temple in El-Deir El-Bahari in Luxor and illegally smuggled out of the country.

3,000-year-old stone found in Egypt meat shop

An Egyptian archaeologist has found a 3,000-year-old stone that dates back to the era of the pharaohs while roaming around a street in the northern city of El-Mahalla.

Archaeologists find compelling evidence for new tombs at Qubbet Al-Hawa site in Aswan

During excavation work carried out below the visitors’ pathway in the northern part of the west Aswan cemetery, at Qubbet Al-Hawa site, archaeologists from the University of Birmingham and the Egypt Exploration Society (EES) Qubbet Al-Hawa Research Project (QHRP), stumbled upon what is believed to be an ancient Egyptian encroachment wall.

Groovy Historian's Medicine in Ancient Egypt



Photo of the week

Mummified remains of Pharaoh Seti I, 19th Dynasty, one of the best-preserved Egyptian mummies, as photographed by Emil Brugsch (1842-1930). Seti I was the father of Ramses the Great (Rameses II)

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