Monday, March 13, 2017

Ancient Egypt this week: Sir Wallis Budge's Curtains



Study, conservation and display of a rare pair of curtains from Late Antique Egypt

An exceptionally well preserved pair of curtains is amongst the remarkable objects displayed in the exhibition, Egypt: faith after the pharaohs. They are said to be from Akhmim in Upper Egypt and date from the 6th–7th centuries AD. Acquired for the British Museum by Sir E. A. Wallis Budge in 1897, they are displayed here for only the second time in the Museum’s history. Made of fine linen and colourful wool, the curtains measure more than 2.7m in height by 2.1m in width, and provide a unique example of complete large scale furnishings from Late Antique Egypt.

Mummy shroud found after 80 years in museum collection
Photo National Museum of Scotland

A unique, full-length mummy shroud which is over 2,000 years old has been discovered after about 80 years in a museum collection. It will be displayed for the first time in The Tomb: Ancient Egyptian Burial exhibition at the National Museum of Scotland on 31 March.
The shroud, which dates to about 9BC, was found during "an in-depth assessment" of Egyptian collections.

Grand Egyptian Museum to open in mid-2018: Antiquities Minister

The Grand Egyptian Museum will be opened by mid-2018, Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Anany declared, adding the ministry needs LE2 billion to open 20 museums that are closed in several governorates.

The Grand Egyptian museum, which is under construction, will be one of the most important museums in Egypt, housing more than 100,000 artifacts from all pharaonic periods.

Recovering Egyptian artefacts from overseas is not in Egypt's favour, says its former antiquities minister
Photo credit Studio Sebert ©

Egypt’s former antiquities minister Mamdouh al-Damaty has called for a change of policy relating to Egyptian artefacts traded abroad.

Egyptian embassies and The Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities have challenged the sale of many artefacts, that had been in collections for decades, often without providing evidence to show that they were stolen.

The minister, speaking at a seminar in Alexandria, said artefacts abroad can benefit the country as they serve as marketing and advertising and in most cases their ownership should not be contested.

Brooklyn Museum Dig Diary for March 3

We arrived in Luxor on March 1 for a short study season at the Mut Precinct – and were just in time to catch a parade celebrating youth from all Egypt’s provinces. This group is performing a traditional stick-dance called “Tahtib” that began as a martial art form and dates back to the Old Kingdom.

Office Hours: A feminist Egyptologist talks ancient, current female political power
(Photo courtesy of Mikel Healey)

Kara Cooney is a professor of Egyptian art and architecture, and serves as the chair of the Department of Near Eastern Language and Cultures. Her accomplishments include producing the archaeology television series “Out of Egypt” on the Discovery Channel, serving as the co-curator of “Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and writing “The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt.” She has a verified Facebook page, on which she regularly shares articles on a variety of subjects, not limited to only Egyptology.

ANCIENT EGYPTIAN PROSTHETICS (Podcast)
(Image: University of Manchester)

Artificial toes from ancient Egypt may have been functional prosthetics.

Sixty-six statues of Sekhmet 'THE POWERFUL ONE'
IMAGE: EPA

ARCHAEOLOGISTS have discovered 66 statues of an Egyptian war goddess believed to have been warding off evil from Amenhotep III’s temple in Luxor, Egypt..

Amenhotep III’s reign, believed to have been between 1386 to 1349 BC, is regarded as the peak of Egypt’s prosperity, power and splendour.
Photo of the week

Whoa. The colors are almost psychedelic or maybe a rock and roll poster.

Part of Ancient Egyptian Glass Mosaic Wadjet eye inlay, made from two halves, Ptolemaic period, c. 1st century, B.C.E; Now in the Corning Museum of Glass, NY (via Dean Krafft/Flickr).

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